Product Search
SHENZHEN OSNPOWER TECH CO.,LTD

Address:Bao An Indutrial Zone,Bao An District ,Shenzhen,China

Tel:+86(0)755-25609940
      +86(0)755-25609941

Fax:+86(0)755-25609943

E-mail:service@osnpower.com

 


Products
Contact usMore>>
Add: Bao An Industrial Zone, Bao An District, Shenzhen, China
Tel:  +86-755-25609940

        +86-755-25609941

Fax: +86-755-25609943

Email:service@osnpower.com
Home  >  Articles  >  LiFePO4 battery

How to Store OSN Li-Batteries

How to Store OSN Li-Batteries

The recommended storage temperature for most batteries is 15°C (59°F); the extreme allowable temperature is 40°C to 50°C (40°C to 122°F) for most chemistries. While lead acid must always be kept at full charge during storage, nickel- and lithium-based chemistries should be stored at around a 40 percent state-of-charge (SOC). This level minimizes age-related capacity loss while keeping the battery in operating condition and allowing self-discharge.

Finding the 40 percent SOC level is difficult because the open circuit voltage (OCV) of batteries does not lend itself well to state-of-charge estimations. For lack of better methods, voltage is nevertheless used as a rough fuel gauge indicator. The SOC of Li-ion is roughly 50 percent at 3.80V/cell and 40 percent at 3.75V/cell. Allow Li-ion to rest 90 minutes after charge or discharge before taking the voltage reading to get equilibrium.

Storage will always cause batteries to age. Low temperature and partial SOC only slow the effect. Table 1 illustrates the recoverable capacity of lithium- and nickel-based batteries at various temperatures and charge levels over one year. The recovered capacity is defined as the available battery capacity after storage
 with a full charge.


Table1: Estimated recoverable capacity when storing OSN Li-battery for one year
Elevated temperature hastens permanent capacity loss. Depending on battery type, lithium-ion is also sensitive to charge levels.

Lithium-ion batteries are often exposed to unfavorable temperatures, and these include leaving a Li-battery in the hot sun or on the power grid. Elevated temperature and allowing the battery to sit at the maximum charge voltage for expended periods of time explains the shorter than expected battery life. Elevated temperature and excessive overcharge also stresses lead and nickel-based batteries. All batteries must have the ability to relax after charged, even when kept on float or trickle charge.